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cliff? are you expecting the economy to go over the fiscal cliff and see these taxes go high hadder and spending cuts take effect? >> my personal view is i'm still optimistic. i think the conversation has been constructive since. do we have a solution on the table yet? no. but i'm optimistic we'll get to a framework. >> why? >> there's been enough dialogue. there's been movement. everyone seems to recognize the problem. everybody realizes there has to be a revenue component, spend component, entitlement reform component. for us, the business community and all the ceos, certainty is the greatest stimulus for us. >> do you support tax rates going higher? >> me personally, as an individual, more importantly the business community, which i'm part of. we support something inclusive. if rates were higher in a videocasset vacuum, i'm not sure we'd be supportive of that. we have to make sure the consumers, those who spends a lot of the dollars, the middle class, are protected in this exercise. >> i guess the question i'm really getting at is, do you get the revenue from tax increases or fro
of that will not happen next year. if they resolve the fiscal cliff and the economy remains growing, although kind of sluggish -- here is another scenario, we have a loss of revenue from growth money. we are in a situation where we will prepare for the best, hope for the best, but anticipate a negative growth in the economy. liz: there is actually what we are calling the twinkie of fact. it is a negative bidder twinkie affect. there is a hostess plant where you live. how many jobs will that drop-off, as far as employment is concerned? >> a few hundred. clearly, any kind of negative constriction of the marketplace impacts us. even if it is a negative state. clearly, here at home, the good news for us is we are going at a 3.5% rate now economically. we are creating jobs. we have a healthy economy and a great quality of life which is attracting people and businesses to utah. we do not have control over what happens in washington, d.c. we are being very cautious as we go forward waiting to see resolution, out of washington, d.c. liz: i saw a quote of something you said. i thought it was perfect for wa
to understand given how much going over the fiscal cliff would hurt the economy. why is going over the fiscal cliff worth it for just this one component? if you can get the other components, why wouldn't you take that? >> good question. thanks for asking. what we're trying to do is put in place a comprehensive balance set of fiscal reforms that put us back on the path to living within our means and create room for investing to make the economy stronger, make sure we're protecting medicare for future generations, and forcing the government to use the taxpayers' resources more wisely. in that context, you have to have a significant amount of revenues. we don't see a way of doing it that makes any sense or has any political viability without rates going up as part of that deal. again, the size of the problem in some sense is so large it can't be solved without rates going up. i think there's a broad recognition of that reality now. if you listen carefully to the talk not just in this town, but you hear what businesses and investors say, i think there's broad recognition that rates are going to g
republicans are holding the global economy hostage over the fiscal cliff. >> susie: and apple shares get of the most widely owned stocks sees heavy trading. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: big job cuts today at one of the nation's biggest banks. citigroup announced it's slashing 4% of its staff; that works out to 11,000 jobs worldwide. the cuts will save the bank more than $1 billion a year in expenses. but they won't be cheap, resulting in a billion-dollar charge against fourth-quarter earnings. is this gloomy news from citi the beginning of other companies doing the same? suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: 11,000 jobs are a lot of layoffs, even for a bank as huge as citi. and there could be more. that's because the monster firm is still struggling to recover from the great recession even though it has fired a lot of other workers in the last few years. the thing is, citi has a new c.e.o. in michael corbat, and experts say he's anxious to make his mark, even if that includes cutting staff. and the need to slim down is not ique to citi; it's indtry- wide. a financial
it matters to your point what happens with the fiscal cliff. the economy is at stalemate. unemployment, we look at jobs report tomorrow, is dismal. we're liking inflationary environment down the road. this is bad news. >> you could could make the argument invite blowing past short term helpful, long term payne full. melissa: spending cuts, tax hikes are very dramatic going over the cliff. when you look at numbers, still is like five to one raising taxes to cutting spending. >> that's right. melissa: no one is really talking about cutting spending. isn't that the first thing you would do? if your fiscal house was in such disarray, household at home, first thing you do is stop spending. no one is doing that. >> what scares me, is that point. whether you agree or disagree hiking taxes i am not a fan of it but i think it will come. we can get past this. charlie gasparino and i have argued this. one of the consequences of the election the president will probably get his way raising most rates. melissa: right. >> i'm not saying i'm a fan. let's get past that, let's make it happen. republicans re
than $600 billion in tax increases and spending cuts kick in. the fiscal cliff potentially sending the economy into recession. the fear of the cliff. is that putting a veil over your eyes and pretending you seeing good news that could make better trades for your portfolio? you need to see the forest for the trees. to help do that, liz saunders in a fox business exclusive, charles schwab's vice president and chief investment strategist. what is the biggest mistake that the investor is making right now as it pertains to navigating that very rocky fiscal cliff landscape? >> they are trying to trade around perceived outcomes. that is fairly treacherous. we don't get a sense that a lot of investors are doing that -- [talking over each other] liz: there were buying in on the dips because they are trading around he headlines. >> there's a lot of tax related strategy happening right now, many of which make a lot of sense, but i have asked the question of loss, what would you put money on a particular outcome? i wouldn't. that is a dangerous strategy. >> one scenario could be as damaging a
the fiscal cliff is an imperative. we are having a one-sided conversation. the republicans have put out a plan saying raise revenue from reach people, banseed, spending cuts, and that landed with a thud over in the white house, no response, and the president has yet to put out a balanced plan, and what we got is i want $1.6 trillion in tax revenue. give it to me. gerri: and rid of the debt ceiling. >> we've seen this movie before. no ceiling, give me the revenue, i'll spend it. now what? until cuts are in place, this doesn't make sense. gerri: i want to hear what ann coulter said about the debate. >> don't cave on everything, but republicans feed into what the media is telling america -- >> wait a minute, i want to understand. you are saying then for pr purposes, they should give into obama on the tax rate. >> not exactly. well, yeah, i guess i am -- >> you're saying obama, who is -- we don't have a revenue problem, ann. >> we lost the election, sean. gerri: what do you think of this? as a strategy, maybe it's the right thing? acknowledge that the american people voted for the president
, today, the markets seem to be done on concerns about the swelling economy and the fiscal cliff, but this comes on a day when oil production in the united states hit another milestone. oil production last month hit the highest level since 1998, another step towards energy independence in the country, and another reason why oil prices are under pressure. the spread between the u.s. and europe, we're making a lot of progress on the oil production front, but across theeboard, we are seeing products really getting hit. oil, a feature today, down over five cents a gallon, and a lot has to do with the warm temperatures and slowing demand. other big news on europe, production coming back and crude pressing it down. the standard here, how the medal -- throwing it to sandra here, how the metals looking? >> gold and silver down, commodities in the red. gold, certainly, no two ways about it, a rough time of it lately. not just down $23 today, but dropping below the $1700 level, but despite that drop today, gold still up about 9%. so far this year, it's had a lot of volatility, but the same
-frank, with respect to where are our national economies going, where is the leadership? and we have the fiscal cliff in the united states. we're three weeks away from that. it's incomprehensible to me personally that we can still be facing that issue -- david: is a possible recession on the horizon? >> well, i hope not. i think that the ramifications of the fiscal cliff, um, will be important. i'm optimistic that we're going to get some leadership in washington that'll actually save us from having to go off that cliff or down that hill, if you will. but i think we are -- there's uncertainty. and whenever there's uncertainty, the market will have less volume in it. liz: tom kloet, good to see you. >> thanks for having me. liz: ceo of the tmx group. david: a u.s. plant right in the heart of canada. they don't realize it yet. [laughter] good to see you. >> thank you. david: well, is now the time to buy apple? a morningstar senior equity analyst thinks so and says some of the blame for the recent decline should fall on washington. why? find out why, coming next. liz: plus, choice hotels expanding its up
to the fiscal cliff. now there is a big potential that that could have a drag on the u.s. economy going forward. ashley: sure. >> i don't think we get to that point though. i think that there is going to be a resolved. i do believe between now and end of the first quarter, now that is a ways away we get it resolved. ashley: yeah. >> i think as we approach the end of the year we hopefully get some kind of guidance by the folks down in washington they're coming to some kind of resolution on it. ashley: and assuming there is some sort of resolution, what does that do to the market? you would expect a bounce. how big of a bounce? >> absolutely. i think you will see a major bounce. you will see the market start to really recover and people investing for the next year, year-and-a-half out. what it is going to do when we get this sort of resolution it is going to clear up the concerns out there. businesses have been sitting largely on the sidelines. investors are sitting on the sidelines. you see businesses understand where their costs are going to be. ashley: actually plan. >> exactly. they can under
now. >> susie: your whole forecast is depending on an agreement on fiscal cliff. if we go over the cliff, what happens to your forecast. what will you be saying at the start of the year about the outlook for the economy and jobs. >> a lot of people are focused on the january 1st deadline. we don't think if we don't have an agreement by january 1st that everything falls apart. what we're watching very closely is if there is still negotiating taking place. if we still see both sides talk, i don't think the january 1st deadline is going to mean that much. we would only worry about the worst-case scenario with the economy contracting if there is a real stalemate and both parties walk away from the talks. we don't expect that. we're beginning to see some signs there is some willingness to compromise on both parties. >> susie: as we said from the start, you're pretty positive on the outlook. gary thayer of wells fargo advisor. >> susie: los angeles and long beach port workers were back at work today, ending a costly eight-day strike. the ports were crippled after clerical workers wen
.6% contraction in the economy because of manufacturers concerns about the fiscal cliff that's coming up. and the report also showed that if we go over the cliff, meaning if we just go over it in the first few days of next year, that we could have a 13% cumulative contraction in the gdp between now and 2015. and 6 million jobs lost. now, a lot of those will come from small and medium sized manufacturers who just aren't willing to take the risk, but i think you're talking to doug in a little bit and larger companies like caterpillar and doug is the incoming chair of the national association of manufacturers, companies like caterpillar rely on those supply chains. so they want to make sure that the small and medium sized manufacturers are just as healthy as the larger. >> jay, thank you. we appreciate your time this morning. >>> coming up, police arresting john mcafee. the details next. ...so as you can see, geico's customer satisfaction is at 97%. mmmm tasty. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee
are not just going to go over the fiscal cliff? we heard tim geithner on this program yesterday when steve asked him, look f you don't get what you want, do we go over the fiscal cliff? he said absolutely. >> he said he would do it! >> what happens when we wake up january nd, we go over the cliff, and the world doesn't end? >> that is so irresponsible. >> you have to be a long-term investor. long-term stocks have outperformed bonds. >> with all do respect, george, are you one of those come play september investors larry is referring to? >> i'd say we're opposite of that. we never take anything for granted, but we bet accordingac. bonds are trouble. a lot of people are going to lose a lot of money in bonds. you have to be prepared for that. interest rates are going to go up. dividends are going to continue to increase. the economy in this country is strong. it's going to get stronger. >> even at 44% dividend tax? >> it's not going to go that high. >> if we go over the fiscal cliff, it does go that high. it goes to 44%. >> no, no. don't think the worst. >> less than a month, it goes there. >
let our economy go over the fiscal cliff if a deal on higher tax rates for the wealthy is not reached? we're checking it out. back in a moment. [ male announcer ] research suggests cell health plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day men's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for men's health concerns as we age. it has 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day men's 50+. it's easy to follow the progress you're making toward all your financial goals. a quick glance, and you can see if you're on track. when the conversation turns to knowing where you stand, turn to us. wells fargo advisors. >>> welcome back. this very public negotiation on the fiscal cliff still does not seem to be closing in on a deal. the white house out in campaign style events regularly, making multiple media appearances, kle including timothy geithner right here in 25 minutes. >> but would things be done faster if it was done privately? in his latest column, jeff goldfor a compares u.s. budget talks to merger proxy battles. jeff joins us to explain about that. plus, we have bob from jones day who
to avoid the fiscal cliff before the end of the year or not, our friday market monitor thinks the economy and the stock market will climb higher next year. hank smith is the chief investment officer of haverford trust, managing $6.5 billion. so, hank, for investors now, will it pay to wait and see? in other words, should they not buy anything now hoping that there's some kind of conclusion before the end of the year? >> well, tom, if they're already invested, stay invested. this is too trick tow try to trade around. but if you do have cash and we have a sell-off because congress fails to bridge this fiscal cliff, we think it will be an extraordinarily good buying opportunity and you should be able to take advantage of that. >> tom: when we saw the first tarp legislation fail in the house, the s & p 500 lost more than 8% in a single day. could we see tha kind violent reaction? >> oh, absolutely. and, you know, it will be the market's way of saying to congress, "ladies and gentlemen, you made a mistake. let's get back into session and have another vote on this." because the full effects of
're going to talk about the fiscal cliff, we're going to talk about the global economy. we're going to talk about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very different plans. house speaker john boehner's counteroffer, if you take a look at the headlines from this $800 billion in what would be savings from tax reform. so that is new tax revenue. but not done by increasing income tax rate on the wealthiest. but instead by closing tax loopholes, eliminating tax credits. and also $600 billion in health savings. that's what you'd get from entitlement reform. from reforming medica
the fiscal cliff could cause major problems for state economies. which face the biggest threat from the potential tax hikes? joining us on the phone is laura porter, managing director at the public finance department, sector head for the state ratings group which focuses on state credits across the country. and focuses on a report, laura, looking granularly at this. good morning. >> good morning. thanks for having me. >> in general, you argue that a lot of ratings on the state front will remain unchanged no matter what. why is that? >> we feel states are fundamentally very strong credits, have strong control over their revenues and spending and the vast majority have shown the ability and willingness to adjust. so we think that the biggest and immediate threat is the fiscal cliff and what that can mean for state revenues, which quickly react to changing economy. >> you make the point -- surprise to no one, you have an unusually high degree of uncertainty in this outlook and that's because -- walk us through a scenario. we go over the cliff, and we begin seeing materially lower reven
in gold. i don't know why it would end. i didn't find -- look. maybe you think that we go to fiscal cliff and it's so deflationary that no one wants to own gold. you could argue that this is a return to the great recession. i don't know. in terms of slowdown in the economy and why inflation is dead. inflation would be dealt a mortal blow if there was inflation by going over the fiscal cliff. austerity does not breed inflation. >> do you believe that sandy is a convenient excuse here for these adp numbers? >> i think sandy was terrible. goldman upgrades waste management today. anyone who has ever been to the giant dumps that waste management has, it's where you dump -- dumping is an expensive thing. when you're a contractor and you have to clean up sandy of which there's immense damage, waste management gets a cut of everything. i think sandy is gigantic. the ripples continue to come. i think new york is going to be hurt very badly by sandy. >> let's move onto starbucks. starbucks today brewing more than coffee. world's largest coffee company announcing during investor day today it plans t
fiscal cliff issue that one of the main areas of the economy of really the country that is going to be impacted after january first is donations to charities. i know you have some thoughts about that, about that concern and how we may have to get the message out that this is such an important focus. tell us about that. >> it is a really difficult question. certainly all of us are looking, you know, potentially as a really big thing. i think what are we going to be left with? we have to look at the bigger picture and say if we are investing in some charities we are investing in our community and we are investing in ourselves. i don't want to see that go away. this is making your world a better place for all of us. >> this great group, these are people that volunteer their time, their efforts and really their hearts. it is so uplifting. i know you probably agree. we talk so much about the negative things. what a great story and great positive event. >> it is an honor to have him here on the floor and for the event tonight. thanks so much. still to come the ceo on holiday season sal
. we're going to talk about the fiscal cliff. if we go over it, will it really destroy the u.s. economy? we'll show you some stats to make you go -- hmm. we'll talk more about apple's slide, should microsoft's ceo steve ballmer get the boot if the surface fails. and we will introduce to you quite possibly the world's dumbest demolition crew. it involves a multi-million dollar bore chateau and really bad bulldozing. >> yikes. see you at 1:00, brian. thank you. >>> listen up wall street recruiters, a recent rash of college cheating scandals has shown academic dishonesty is unfortunately a very big problem on campus today. who are the worst offenders? tonight's premier of "faking the grade -- classroom cheaters," we'll tell you. they'll find out which students are most likely to cut corners in the battle to gain an edge. >> reporter: don mccabe and his canadian colleague collaborate on research. mccabe says in the u.s. business students cheat the most. engineering students are often near the top of the list. and so are communications and journalism students. women studied at one university
so much that in anticipation of the fiscal cliff and not knowing what it is going to mean to the economy they have been basically reining in business spending and hiring. i think actually it sets up for release of pent-up demand if you will in 2013 which could help the economy reaccelerate. dennis: mark, it seems to me like we've never been farther apart. with what geithner said this weekend, the only way we have compromise if the republicans raise rates on the rich. i'm just wondering, aren't we going off this cliff? >> well, dennis, i think we're likely to go off of it. the question is whether it is rendered into a slope versus a cliff. at this juncture seems unlikely give the fact we have a lame-duck congress. we have 20 days until the end of the year, the triggerr the fiscal cliff. obviously as you said, increasing acrimony across party lines as opposed to the happy talk we heard just after the election. i think though if the market saw there was at least a down payment on the fiscal cliff, something agreed to be picked up after the first of the year, i think equity pr
, new york. >>> starbucks ceo says going over the fiscal cliff is a bitter brew for the global economy. ali is back with more on that. >>> plus, time to buy apple stock? that's next. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't work on runny noses. what? [ male announcer ] it doesn't have an antihistamine. really? [ male announcer ] really. alka-seltzer plus cold and cough fights your worst cold symptoms, plus has a fast acting antihistamine to relieve your runny nose. [ sighs ] thank you! [ male announcer ] you're welcome. that's the cold truth! [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus. ♪ oh what a relief it is! ♪ [ male announcer ] can't find theraflu? try alka-seltzer plus for fast, liquid, cold, and flu relief. ♪ >>> democrats need to own up to taxes because they can't have their cake and eat it, too. from the cnn money newsroom, i'm ali velshi. this is "your money." i'm going to tell you what others won't about the fiscal cliff. the head of starbucks said it will damage the u.s.'s reputation and shenanigans from capitol hill and with a cool 500 bucks to spend, should you use the
take. thanks for being with us. do you think we are going over the cliff? >> cliff of sorts. the fiscal cliff was created by politicians who lack the courage to do the best for the american people. and already has done severe damage to the economy. now we have democrats who want to suck money out of the economy in tax and we have rhino republicans in name only who wants spending cuts. both those things will do damag% to the economy and any compromise will damage the economy and push it further into deep recession. neither side discusses the real problem which is the enormous costs of big government. cost in money and regulations and intrusion. neither side discusses that because they are career politicians and big government is their career. dennis: what should republicans do? should they cave and let tax rates go up on the rich or hold out and let the company -- the country go over the cliff? >> they hold out and let the country go over the cliff and aasolutely insure this lending limit, borrowing limit is enforced. to force government to shrink itself. this is the only way they will d
, as the fiscal cliff debate developments, there is limited up side for interest rates and it's hard to see stocks moving much higher. >> so let's suppose we get an agreement. that should increase confidence. does that mean the economy performs better next year than we expect and then what's the feed through from that? >> yeah, i think while we're now focused on a lot of the down side risks not only from the fiscal cliff but obviously also from the eurozone crisis, we may have overlooked some of these up side potential for next year. so if we get a favorable resolution for the fiscal cliff, i think we can see interest rates move up quite sharply. that would be because expectations for growth could be much higher, so if growth is around the 2% in the first half of the year, we could be haufing over the 3% range in the second half of the rear. that would mean higher interest rates and that could be a very poor result for top quality bonds. >> and when you're talk about interest rates, you're talking about market rates as opposed to fed rates, right? >> the treasury rate, baseline underwhich say corp
, appreciate it very much. >> thanks. >>> with just 26 days until we fall off the tax and fiscal cliff, two dozen house republicans have apparently defected from the boehner plan and signed a bipartisan letter with democrats. people are now asking is there a fallback position for the gop? well, here now to tell us is house majority whip california republican kevin mccarthy, the number three man. mr. mccarthy, as always, thank you for coming back on the show. can i get your comment on this letter, two dozen republicans, they're talking about tax rate flexibility along with a bunch of democrats. what's your take, sir? >> well, remember what they're saying here. what they're saying is that they're going to put everything on to the table. what we've been talking about for so long is where the president has been awol, this is a spending issue that we have a real problem with. we agree that we'll provide revenue, but we do not want to hurt a pro growth economy here. so it's how you go about it. that's why we think the rates have to be frozen. the other thing we're look at, the president says he w
and paid huge dividends. stuart: i've got 30 seconds. >> yes. stuart: are we going to get a fiscal cliff avoid dan deal? >> we may get some form of a deal. we are not going to get a real deal. i think the economy is going to be hurt and i think both sides, especially the president deserve blame. stuart: who will get the blame? >> the republicans clearly are going to get the blame and hurting themselves. stuart: but we may go into a much slower economy and hurts the president. >> bad news for the president and even worse news for the the american people. stuart: i agree with that. all right, doug, not bad the at all. >> still a democrat. stuart: is that a tag line to every interview? >> it may well be. doug, thanks very much indeed. >> the so the president has made it very, very clear, drawn a line, no fiscal cliff deal without higher tax rates for the highest earningers, tax rates have got to go up. question, what will speaker boehner have to say about that? his reaction will be new at ten this morning. mark stein is going to be here as well and he'll join us to explore that and more. we
. connell: sending the two-party over the fiscal cliff. a number of conservatives that say the president is getting offered too much. dagen: walt has his review. there are some things he says you need to know about. the u.s. economy added 111,000 private sector jobs according to adp. a bit weaker than expected. because of impacts from hurricane sandy. the bank saying it is looking for ways to cut expenses. those cuts amount to 4% of the companies workforce and is estimated to save $1.1 billion every year. stocks now and every 15 minutes. nicole petallides. nicole: we are looking at a market that is to the downside. let's take a look at citigroup. it is about 4% of the workforce. citigroup is higher. it has had an up arrow throughout the day today. we saw the dow jones industrials this week to the downside. we had two consecutive days in selling. down arrows for the nasdaq. down 1.1%. connell: breaking news out of washington. earlier, speaker boehner speaking about the fiscal cliff. now it is president obama. let's listen. >> we have emerged not yet where we need to be, but we certainly h
to avoid the fiscal cliff, carl. >> times a-wastin. with the deadline inching closer what needs to be done to reach an agreement? judd gregg is a former republican senator, governor of new hampshire and co-chair of the campaign to fix the debt as well as a cnbc contributor. i'm glad to say he's at post nine. good to have you back. >> great to be here, carl. >> is the conventional wisdom that the president has won this round correct and is that good if your goal is to get to a deal in the end? >> i think the president clearly has the microphone and he has the election behind him as the winner so he obviously has more cards i believe than the republicans have, but i think speaker boehner has acted very responsibly here, come forward with a very aggressive proposal. he said he's willing to raise revenues so he's moved that needle very considerably. and to me all that needs to be done to get this deal done is for the two of them to get in a room and ask the staff to go to lunch and they work it out, because the parameters of an agreement are pretty clear. >> the speaker has not brought up rate
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)